Archive for the ‘Articles’ Category

Yard of the Month Winner

Windermere Garden Club member Joan Y. has again received Orange Tree’s yard of the month. See the photo below of Joan with fellow members.

Left to Right: Mary S., Carol W., Joan Y. with dog, Clare D.

Left to Right: Mary S., Carol W., Joan Y. with dog, Clare D.

2014 Newcomers’ Event-March 14th

On Friday, March 14th, at the home of Marie H. our club had a newcomers’ event for all the new members who have recently joined our club. The officers and several of our committee chairmen provided the refreshments for the event. Thank you to everyone and especially our hostess Marie H. for allowing us to use her beautiful home.

Left to right: Hostess Marie H., Corresponding Sec. Jackie R., 2nd VP Maureen T., and new members Margie F. and Barbara A.

Left to right: Hostess Marie H., Corresponding Sec. Jackie R., 2nd VP Maureen T., & new members Margie F. & Barbara A.


New members at the 2014 Newcomers' Event. Sitting down is Kim F., center is Janet S. and on right is Barbara A.

New members at the 2014 Newcomers’ Event.
Sitting down is Kim F., center is Janet S. and on right is Barbara A.

Yellow sweater is new member Denise H., Center is 1st VP Jill T. and behind plant is Recording Sec. Clare D.

Yellow sweater is new member Denise H., Center is 1st VP Jill T. and behind plant is Recording Sec. Clare D.

President Peggy C. at Newcomers' Event 2014

President Peggy C. at Newcomers’ Event 2014

Newcomers' Event Hostess Marie H.

Newcomers’ Event Hostess Marie H.

ECO Saturdays

Please click on the link below to view a copy of the ECO Saturday’s Feb.-May 2014 events at the Tibet-Butler Preserve and Vera Carter Environmental Center that our 1st VP Jill T. discussed at our March 13, 2014 general meeting. Tibet-Butler Preserve and Vera Carter Environmental Center are located at 8777 County Road 535, Orlando, FL 32835. These programs are usually are free and are presented by Orange County Parks and Recreation.

http://www.orangecountyfl.net/Portals/0/Library/Culture-Recreation/ParksModule/docs/Feb14-May14%20Eco%20Sat%20Flyer.pdf

2014 Florida Arbor Day

Our 2014 Florida Arbor Day tree planting was on Thursday, Jan.17th in front of Windermere Town Hall. We planted a Florida native cedar tree which will be used by the Town of Windermere as an outdoor Christmas tree going forward. The children of Windermere Union Church’s Preschool performed again this year and helped mulch the tree. Special thanks to everyone who helped make this a great tree planting especially co-chairmen Jackie Rapport and Peggy Collins.

Windermere Union Church Preschoolers with Windermere's  20 Year Tree City flag.

Windermere Union Church Preschoolers with Windermere’s 20 Year Tree City flag.

Members preparing refreshments for children

Members preparing refreshments for children

Jackie Rapport at the microphone. Jackie and President Peggy Collins were co-chairmen of the tree planting
Co-Chairman Jackie Rapport at the microphone.

2014 Arbor Day-Cedar Tree
Florida Native Cedar Tree we planted.

End the Pesticide That’s Killing Bees

This report courtesy of Garden Club Member, Theresa Schretzmann-Myers:

“Excellent scientific articles cited at the bottom of this petition regarding Colony Collapse Disorder and the link to pesticides. Good information to get out to our members and on to our website.”
Tell the EPA: Immediately suspend the pesticide that is killing bees!

Click below to automatically sign the petition urging EPA to take immediate action now:

http://act.credoaction.com/r/?r=6995405&p=efsa_bees&id=53727-3028417-Q1jmnEx&t=4

In light of new evidence showing that the pesticide clothianidin poses a significant danger to bees, EPA should take immediate action to suspend its use.

Bees have been dying off in the US at an alarming rate — nearly 30% of our bee population, per year, have been lost to so-called colony collapse since 2006.

Scientists have long thought that the pesticide clothianidin was at least partially to blame.1 But the EPA has repeatedly ignored scientists’ warnings and Americans’ urgings to ban its use, citing lack of evidence.

Now, a blockbuster study released last week by Europe ‘s leading food safety authority, EFSA, has for the first time labeled clothianidin as an “unacceptable” danger to bees.2

The EFSA study could be a major breakthrough to convince the EPA to take emergency action, and suspend the use of clothianidin to stop the precipitous decline in global honeybee populations.

In addition to finding clothianidin too dangerous to use on plants pollinated by bees, EFSA’s study specifically identifies as too flawed to be useful the shoddy studies provided by pesticide manufacturer Bayer as evidence of clothianidin’s safety.3

It was these sham studies that EPA used to first approve clothianidin in 2003, even against the objections of EPA’s own scientists.4

The pesticide, which is used to treat seeds like corn and canola, expresses itself through the plants’ pollen and nectar — the honeybee’s favorite sources of food. Clothianidin is in a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids, which are relatively new, and their use coincides with the rise of colony collapse.

If EPA does not take emergency action now, it won’t review clothianidin again until 2018.

Given the rate of colony collapse, and the indispensable role that pollinators play in our food system — pollinating one-third of our food crops and providing literally billions of dollars in economic benefit — it would be stunningly irresponsible of EPA to continue allowing the use of this dangerous pesticide for at least another five years.

Click below to automatically sign the petition urging EPA to take immediate action now:

http://act.credoaction.com/r/?r=6995405&p=efsa_bees&id=53727-3028417-Q1jmnEx&t=4

Thank you for speaking out for the bees.

Elijah Zarlin, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

Learn more about this campaign

1. “Insecticide ‘unacceptable’ danger to bees, report finds,” Guardian, 1/16/13
2. “Pesticides and Honey Bees: State of the Science,” Pesticide Action Network North America (Must have Adobe Reader to open)
3. “European Agency concludes neonicotinoid pesticides too dangerous for bees,” NRDC, 1/16/13

Sat, Feb 9 2013 – ISA Arborists & Nehrling Gardens Restore Historic Landmark Tree Canopy

2013 02-09 - Nehrling Gdns Cleanup

Contact Person: Theresa Schretzmann-Myers

Mobile: 407-579-4621

theresa.myers@nehrlinggardens.org

ISA FLORIDA  CHAPTER ARBORISTS  & NEHRLING GARDENS COLLABORATE TO RESTORE HISTORIC LANDMARK TREE CANOPY

GARDENS CONTAIN LIVING HISTORY OF HERITAGE TREES AND PALMS INSTRUMENTAL IN FOUNDING OF FLORIDA ’S HORTICULTURAL INDUSTRY

Saturday, February 9, 2013 – The International Society of Arboriculture Florida Chapter and Nehrling  Gardens complete the ISA Florida Chapter Loren Westenberger Work Day on Saturday, February 9, from 8 am – 2 pm at Historic Landmark Nehrling  Gardens , 2267 Hempel Avenue , Gotha , FL.   The work day focuses on restoration pruning of historic trees and palms along Hempel Avenue .  These include some of Florida ’s oldest native trees, tropical trees and hybrid Palms that were instrumental in the genesis of Florida ’s horticultural history and science. 

Nehrling Gardens was the recipient of the ISA Florida Chapter Work Day in 2011 to complete safety pruning on historic tree canopy damaged by the 2004 hurricanes and make the property safe for educational tours.  Many of the arborists return Saturday to continue restoration of  the historic tree canopy.  “I chose to do restoration pruning on the giant Podocarpus nagibecause it’s an unusual tree and there are not that many specimens this old or large left.  It’s uncommon, unique and beautiful.  There are a couple of larger branches that still need to be reduced to keep the longer limbs from breaking and protect it from further storm damage,” said ISA Certified Master Arborist Eric Engstrom.

The remaining 6-acre gardens and historic tree canopy are the work of Dr. Henry Nehrling, ornithologist, botanist and plant breeder, born in Sheboygan County , Wis. , May 9, 1853 of German-American parentage.  Henry Nehrling Society Inc. dba Nehrling Gardens  purchased the last 6 remaining acres with the goal of creating a history and education center focused on historic preservation, horticultural education and environmental conservation.  Educational tours are available by appointment at info@nehrlinggardens.org

ISA Certified Arborists from Davey Tree Company, A & J Tree & Landscape Service, GreenburstTree & Landscape, Arboriculture Tree Services and Enviro Tree Service will complete restoration pruning on historic trees and palms and remove exotic invasive Camphor trees.  Their restoration focus will be on the tree canopy located along Hemple Avenue frontage road and the Oaks on the property’s south side.  Dead wood removed from historic trees and dead fronds taken off palms stimulate hormones in the trees to regenerate healthy new growth and restore the canopy.  Invasive Camphor trees may be removed to allow more light penetration for historic trees and palms and its pungent mulch recycled along the gardens nature trails.  ISA Work Day Coordinator is Certified Arborist Mike Robinson , Jacksonville JEA Forester, 904-738-6330, Robimr@jea.com

Nehrling originally purchased 40 acres of land in the newly founded German-American community of Gotha  in 1885.  Nehrling was a collaborator of the USDA Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction of the Bureau of Plant Industry.  From this office he received many plants, but also furnished them with plant material obtained from other sources.  His collection of Palms, Bamboos, Magnolias and tropical plants such as caladiums, amaryllis and crinums made his garden the Mecca of horticulturalists who came to Florida , as well as a perpetual source of wonder to the plantsmen of Florida who were lucky enough to visit it. 

Contact Person: Theresa Schretzmann-Myers

Mobile: 407-579-4621

theresa.myers@nehrlinggardens.org

Miami Herald Article About Nehrling Gardens

Restoring the Home of Florida’s Horticultural Pioneer, Henry Nehrling by Marjie Lambert / Miami Herald Staff

Angela Withers, president of the Henry Nehrling Society, and Theresa Schretzmann-Myers, vice president, in the garden behind the Nehrling house.

Angela Withers, president of the Henry Nehrling Society, and Theresa Schretzmann-Myers, vice president, in the garden behind the Nehrling house.

During the summer, the kudzu and air potato vines came creeping back, threatening to reclaim the ground that dozens of volunteers Click here to read more: